SIMILES (LOW B2)

similestwo_peas_in_a_pod_by_ibold-d3d6lol

TODAY, WHEN TALKING ABOUT NATURE OR NURTURE, I TOLD YOU THAT IN SPITE OF A SIMILAR UPBRINGING, MY DAUGHTERS COULDN´T BE MORE  DIFFERENT FROM EACH OTHER, AS DIFFERENT AS CHALK AND CHEESE.

TO BE HONEST THEY AREN´T AS SIMILAR AS TWO PEAS IN A POD

A simile is a type of idiom and links one thing to another thing. Similes often contain  as … as or   like.

SIM

As … as similes (e.g. as heavy as lead, as strong as an ox) always begin with an adjective and are easy to understand, even if you don’t know the meaning of the noun which follows. (In the above examples the nouns are lead and ox.)

Common English similes

Here’s a list of common similes.

  • as strong as an ox (about a person with great strength)
  • as light as a feather (when something weighs very little)
  • as busy as a bee
  • as quiet as a mouse (someone who is shy and untalkative; someone who is being quiet so as not to be heard)
  • as quick as a flash (when something moves fast; someone does something quickly)
  • as dry as a bone (when something is very or totally dry)

Similes with colours

  • as white as a sheet (when somene’s face is white due to fear)
  • as red as a beetroot (someone’s face when embarrassed)
  • as brown as a berry (when someone has a deep suntan)
  • as black as night

Watch out – the following similes might be offensive and should be used with care:

  • as deaf as a post (to describe someone who hears badly)
  • as blind as a bat (to describe someone who sees badly)
  • as thin as a rake (to describe someone who is very slim/underweight)
  • as mad as a hatter (to describe someone who is eccentric)
  • as drunk as a lord (when someone has drunk too much)

Similes with ‘like’

  • to eat like a horse (to describe someone who always has a big appetite)
  • to drink like a fish (to describe someone who always drinks a lot of alcohol)
  • to have a memory like a sieve (about a forgetful person – sieves have holes in them)
  • to sleep like a log (to sleep very deeply and for a long time)
  • to have eyes like a hawk (describing someone who sees every small detail)
  • to work like a dream (when something works perfectly, e.g. a plan, a machine)

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Posted on January 20, 2016, in UNCATEGORIZED. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Maybe I’m writting false friends:
    As healthy as a horse.
    As bad as a toothache

    Like

  2. AS HEALTHY AS A HORSE is perfect….. but I have never heard the other one. I´ve heard “as bad as the itch”…… OR…”as bad as the blight”. But if it´s “creative writing” WHY NOT?

    Like

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LEARN NEW WORDS, EXPRESSIONS, PHRASES...

Helendipity Weblog

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Practical Discovery of English Pronunciation

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